Sunday, February 27, 2011

"Vintage Crocheted Tablecloth" ~ It's a Miracle!

Well, at least for me it was a miracle!

Back on February 25, 2009 you may remember (or not) that I did a Wordless Wednesday post of a tablecloth. At that time, and up until now it was the only tablecloth like it that I had ever seen.

Let me share a bit of history regarding that tablecloth. Back in about 1978 or 1979 I found a beautiful crocheted tablecloth pattern which I decided to make. I had never made a tablecloth before, but I had crocheted a top from thread. I saw the top modeled on the front page of a magazine and fell in love with it. I taught myself to crochet making that top. It was beautiful, it had long bell lacy sleeves...not sure if I have that top any longer...in fact I made two of them, my girlfriend loved it so much, she wanted one.

Anyway, back to the tablecloth. It was made with circular medallions. I can remember when I made my first ones, it took me four hours to make one medallion.Then they had to be crocheted together with the "webbing" done in between. At that rate, I never thought I would ever be able to finished the tablecloth! The challenge came...my ex-father-in-law said I would never complete the project. That was a mistake! Now I had to finish the tablecloth!

Two years and a baby later, I finished that tablecloth and proudly displayed it on my dining room table. I amazed my ex-father-in-law, and everyone ranted about my tablecloth. Because of the compliments I received I decided to enter it in the local fair. I had never entered anything in a fair before or since that time. This was something new to me. Since I was already entering something in the fair, I decided to enter a few other crochet items also that fit into different categories than my tablecloth.

The day came, I went to the fair to see if any of my projects happened to win a prize. I can't really remember the other projects I entered, but I am thinking maybe a baby blanket and some sort of baby clothes. I will have to look to see if I have pictures of those items anywhere. Lo and behold all but maybe one of my items took first or second place and were displayed with the appropriate ribbons. Wow, I was so surprised! But where was my tablecloth? I hadn't seen it. I walked around the inside of the building again looking for it.

Finally, there it was! In it's own separate case, all by itself, beautifully draped with a "Best of Fair" ribbon! It had received a special award! I was amazed! I also received a silver platter with the date, my name and Best of Fair engraved on it. I was more than stunned. The women who worked the fair started encouraging  me to send my tablecloth on to the State Fair. I thought they were nuts! Besides, it made me a bit nervous just thinking about mailing my tablecloth to Sacramento, or anywhere. What if it got lost? I had many hours involved in making this, I didn't want to loose it. But they kept insisting...so...ok, so I mailed it to Sacramento.



Upon returning from a trip to Lake Tahoe, I stopped at the California State Fair not very optimistic that my tablecloth faired very well in this venue. Long story short, it won first place! Can you believe it? Wow! I still hadn't given myself much credit on what a nice job I had done making this. Nor did I worry very much about the darn thing after it won all the awards.

For many years now, my tablecloth has been put away. The dog I had back in the 80's used to get on top of my antique dining room table (yes, where my tablecloth was displayed) when I wasn't home, and wait for my return. Inevitably, he marked my tablecloth with a few spots that actually look like grease. I need to replace a couple of medallions now, and just haven't done it. My one of a kind, award winning tablecloth...had been packed away, until now.

Two weeks ago I was browsing my Google Reader when I happened upon a craft blog I follow entitled "My Shabby Chateau." This blog was displaying a "Vintage Crocheted Tablecloth." There, right before my eyes was "my"  tablecloth, beautifully displayed! Actually, it really wasn't mine, but it was the exact pattern!

I contacted Donna from the blog and shared my story, along with a link of my tablecloth. She came back to me and said I had "her" tablecloth! To funny. It turns out it is the same exact pattern. Donna's is in white,  mine is ecru. Mine was made for an antique table, hence ecru. My tablecloth has 228 medallions and hers has 180 medallions. The pattern is called Aunt Mary's.

You must now go see her tablecloth and read her story about how she came to owning hers! Her story is here: "Vintage Crocheted Tablecloth."  She has a very beautiful blog! I love her pictures and display! Wow, is she fortunate, and what a story! Thank you Donna for sharing your tablecloth and finally making me realize how "special, and vintage" my tablecloth really is. Maybe now that is it out, I will even repair the few stained medallions.

I really and truly feel now, finally, that my tablecloth is beautiful, well made, vintage and priceless! I just hope my descendants who end up owning it will feel the same way.

Thanks for stopping by!

Wishing you success in all of your genealogical treasure hunts!






Copyright © 2011 Cheryl Palmer

Friday, February 25, 2011

Westby ~ 1920 Federal Census

My great grandparents were Halvor Torgelson Westby and Kari Halvorsdatter Sjøli, who are shown below ~


The 1920 Federal Census states this Westby family lived at house 100 and were family 101. "H" Westby is head of the house, 58 years old and a farmer. His wife,"Carrie" [sic] is 56 and does not have a trade or profession. The Westby's own their home and have a mortgage. Both were born in Norway as were each of their parents.

"Jalmer" [sic] is next on this census. He is also listed as being head of the household and a farmer, at nineteen years old and single. He did not attend school, could read and write, and was born in Minnesota. As a matter of fact the rest of the family shown on this census living in this home did not attend school, could read and write, and were born in Minnesota.

A single male, Emi (I believe this is Ingvald, it is the first time I have seen him being referred to as Emi) , is shown following "Jalmer" [sic]. Emi  is another farmer and is 17 years old. Clifford follows and is 15. He is not shown as having a trade. Olga, the first female to be listed after Kari, is 12 years of age, while Thina, who happens to be my grandmother and the last member living in this house, is 10. Everyone in the family is listed as white.

I transcribed this family record completely on May 13, 2007. I also transcribed and added the next person in  the census as I recognized the surname and knew this person was involved in my family history. (A prime example of paying close attention to everyone listed on the census pages!)

This last person I transcribed was E A Soderlund. His house number was 101 and he was family 102. By the way, I don't think I mentioned that the street these people lived on was listed as "farm." E A Soderlund owned his home, had a mortgage and was 51 years old. He and his parents were born in Sweden. He too was a farmer. The year of immigration shows as unknown, reading and writing he could do.

I had hoped to share the census transcription here, however technical difficulties have prevented that at this time. I hope I can share this in the near future.

Thanks for stopping by!

Wishing you success in all of your genealogical treasure hunts!




Copyright © 2011 Cheryl Palmer

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Wordless Wednesday ~ Postcard of Unknown Men





Picture postcard; unknown people, scanned from brown Lundberg/Sweden album.

Thanks for stopping by!

Wishing you success in all of your genealogical treasure hunts!



Copyright © 2011 Cheryl Palmer

Sunday, February 20, 2011

Sentimental Sunday ~ Western Union Telegram







Do you remember telegrams? Western Union Telegrams were a bit before my time. I have scanned the few that were kept and received by my paternal family back in the day. 

This telegram was sent to my grandmother from Obed Olson stating his brother Philip had passed away on Wednesday March 9, 1960. It also let the family know that the funeral services were to be on Saturday at 2:00pm at Coop Mortuary in Hibbing, Minnesota. The telegram was to be received by Friday (which would have been March 11) and the funeral with the funeral being the next day I highly doubt my grandparents made if from California to Minnesota for the funeral.

Philip and Obed Olson were my first cousin once removed. Unfortunately, I never met either of them.


Thanks for stopping by! 

Wishing you success in all of your genealogical treasure hunts! 



Copyright © 2011 Cheryl Palmer

Monday, February 14, 2011

Valentine's Dance ~ 1978




This is one of my favorite pictures of my mother's father and his wife. My grandparents were very special to me and I miss them very much. My grandmother was a member of the Beta Sigma Phi and she loved attending and participating in every function she could.

 She was very active and I know that is what kept her 
so young at heart. My grandfather was very supportive and participated in any and all functions grandma encountered. Enjoyment at everything they attended or held was always very obvious. They were a match made in heaven! What better day to share this event that they attended than Valentine's Day?

Thanks for stopping by! 

Wishing you success in all of your genealogical treasure hunts! 




Copyright © 2011 Cheryl Palmer

Monday, February 7, 2011

A Class, TV, Computer and Internet BlogTalk Radio




This past weekend has been very interesting and busy for me! Friday morning started out with a free online Roots Magic class on Sources and Citations. This class couldn't have come at a better time for me, as I was planning on spending the weekend working on this very subject! Roots Magic's Bruce Buzbee did a fantastic job showing and explaining how to use the source and citations fields. I took almost three pages of notes and learned a lot about the program. Roots Magic is going to serve as home for "perfect tree." Well, as perfect as it can be anyway for the information I have. I have used Family Tree for the past ten years. It is not all sourced and "perfect" as it should be. I think we all start out like this. I have now decided it is time for my tree to be done as professional as possible!




Friday night was WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? Season two's premier was all about Vanessa Williams finding her roots. All I can say is, I am so glad to have the show back! I love this show! Most of you know I am not a TV watcher, so there are very few shows I follow. This is one of them! I am not going to write a review regarding the show, as so  many others have done, but I will say that I was very pleased that after the commercials they didn't waste time "reviewing" what was already covered prior to the commercial. Wonderful! Next Friday night we will see Tim McGraw uncover his father's roots! If you missed Vanessa Williams, you can view the show from either of the highlighted links above.




After the show I headed on over to Thomas Mac Entee's newest venture, GeneaBlogger's Blog Talk Radio. Thomas hosted a two hour discussion of WDYTYA. Since I am on the west coast and hadn't seen the program yet, I chose to listen to the taped version verses participate during the live broadcast which was held in Chicago. As always Thomas had a fabulous idea and the show was fantastic in my eyes. Those who called in with comments and questions really added to the show. I am disappointed however that the time zones make it difficult for him to run the show when the whole country can participate after seeing the program. I do understand the challenge regarding that and will probably listen to the taped versions so it doesn't spoil the TV show. Great job Thomas, I enjoyed your radio show very much!



The whole rest of the weekend I spent working on one of my genealogy goals for this year, sourcing and entering my research one person, one item at a time into Roots Magic. My husband was away for the weekend so I planned to devote the whole weekend working on this, except for a bit Saturday night when I was going to spend some prime time with the princess, my granddaughter. I got on a roll entering sources and information and ended up really enjoying the process and feeling very proud of myself for all I accomplished. My husband came home early, but I didn't let that deter me from my plans. He was very understanding and even made me dinner Sunday night. I am so spoiled.


Thanks for stopping by!

Wishing you success in all of your genealogical treasure hunts!





 Copyright © 2011 Cheryl Palmer

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Ancestry dot com Press Release

I Received this press release from Ancestry.com today ~


Ancestry.com Marks Black History Month with 250,000 New African American Records

Nearly 35 Million Americans Can Find an Ancestor in the World’s Largest Online Collection of African American Family History Records
PROVO, UTAH (February 1, 2011) – In honor of Black History Month, Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today launched more than 250,000 new historical records documenting early African American family history. The five new collections span more than a century and contain important details about the lives of African Americans who bravely fought in the U.S. Civil War, document the transportation of slaves to and from the prominent slave ports of New Orleans and Savannah, GA, and include poignant first-person accounts from former slaves. 
Ancestry.com’s historical record collection now contains more than 3.2 million African American slave records. As 88 percent of the United States’ black population in 1850 was comprised of slaves, when extrapolated to its current population, nearly 35 million Americans may find a slave ancestor in Ancestry.com’s African American collections.
The Ancestry.com African American Historical Record Collection includes thousands of poignant stories that bring this part of American history to life. One story outlines how Solomon Northup was lured from New York to Washington, D.C with the promise of a job in a circus. Instead he was kidnapped, put on a boat to New Orleans and sold into slavery. His liberation in 1853 prompted him to write “Twelve Years a Slave, 1841-1853,” which became both a popular seller at the time and an important historical document. The ship record of his transfer to New Orleans, which also lists most of the cast of characters from his book, can be found in Ancestry.com’s Slave Ship Manifests from New Orleans, 1807-1860. (original record images available)
The five new collections form part of the 60 million records already included in Ancestry.com’s African American Historical Record collection—the largest online collection of African American family history records available. These new collections are:
  • US Colored Troops Service Records, 1861-1867: Approximately 178,000 African American troops served the Union in the final two years of the US Civil War. Their compiled service records include enlistment papers, casualty sheets, death reports and correspondence.
  • Slave Ship Manifests from Savannah, 1789-1859: Although the transatlantic slave trade was banned in 1807, the internal transportation of slaves remained, especially as the tobacco industry diminished in the North while the cotton industry boomed in the South. These port records document the arrival and departure of more than 10,000 slaves through the port of Savannah, GA.
  • Slave Ship Manifests from New Orleans, 1807-1860: Another important Southern port, this collection includes records for more than 100,000 slaves who arrived or departed through the port of New Orleans.
  • Freedmen’s Bureau Records, 1865-1878: The Freedmen’s Bureau was formed after the Civil War to aid in Reconstruction efforts. This collection contains hundreds of thousands of records relating to former slaves the Bureau helped find work, to establish schools, negotiate contracts, seek medical care, legalize marriages and more.
  • Slave Narratives, 1936-1938 (updated): In the early 1930s, an effort began to document the life stories of 3,500 former slaves. The result is a series of moving, individual accounts of their lives, as told in their own words.
With collections such as these now online and searchable for the first time, exploring African American roots is becoming increasingly accessible and popular. For example, leading African American actress and singer Vanessa Williams’ own family journey will be showcased during the second-season premiere of the hit NBC series “Who Do You Think You Are?”on Friday, February 4.  Ancestry.com is the official sponsor for the NBC series and worked closely with the producers to provide the family history research for those celebrities featured. Lionel Richie’s family history will also be showcased this season, building on the compelling African American stories of Spike Lee and Emmitt Smith, who were featured last season.
“As we continue to expand our collection of African American family history records, more Americans than ever can make exciting breakthroughs when researching their early heritage,” said Josh Hanna, Head of Global Marketing at Ancestry.com. “According to independent statistical analysis, one in nine Americans has early African roots and so may have ancestors just waiting to be discovered in our collections.” 
These inspiring collections can help millions of African Americans uncover their own family stories.  To search the African American Historical Record Collection, visit www.ancestry.com/aahistory. For further stories and updates related to African American family history research, you can also follow Ancestry.com on Facebook  and Twitter.
About Ancestry.com 
Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOM) is the world's largest online family history resource, with nearly 1.4 million paying subscribers. More than 6 billion records have been added to the site in the past 14 years. Ancestry users have created more than 20 million family trees containing over 2 billion profiles. Ancestry.com has local Web sites directed at nine countries that help people discover, preserve and share their family history, including its flagship Web site at www.ancestry.com.



Thanks for stopping by!

Wishing you success in all of your genealogical treasure hunts!


Copyright © 2011 Cheryl Palmer

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Harley Quilt Update

It has been awhile since I have shared anything regarding my first ever quilt I am making which will eventually become an heirloom, hopefully, for one of my ancestors. People have been asking to see pictures. So here is a bit of an update. This first picture shows when I started ripping out the borders. Yep I ripped them all out because the seams weren't the proper size. 


I then re-pinned and started again.


Close to finishing with the borders. It went smooth this time except I was a little short on two of the colors and needed to buy more fabric.


Once the borders were completed I cut the fabric (using my cutting mat from now on! lol) that is to be sewn in between the squares and laid it out on my floor.


Now I am sewing the fabric that goes in between the squares on each row.


and pressing the seams.


The four rows are complete!



Thanks for stopping by! 


Wishing you success in all of your genealogical treasure hunts! 




Copyright © 2011 Cheryl Palmer